Education Issues

The Word Knowledge ASVAB Test – What You Can Expect

If you’re about to take the ASVAB test, then it’s a good chance you’re considering joining the United States Armed Forces. The ASVAB or Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Test consists of nine sections, which consist of subjects like arithmetic reasoning, mechanical comprehension, automotive and shop information, general science, paragraph comprehension and more. But it’s the word knowledge ASVAB portion of the test that typically gives potential recruits the most anxiety. If you are stressed out about taking the word portion of the test, relax. By understanding more about the ASVAB and the word portion of the test, you’ll be much more relaxed and worry free in the days leading up to test.
ASVAB Scoring
Before you start freaking out about the word knowledge ASVAB or about any other portion of the test, you should understand why the test is taken and what test scorers are primarily looking for. Just like the SAT test, the ASVAB is timed and is primarily offered at high schools and other learning institutions all throughout the country. The test is meant to determine where the potential recruit’s strengths would lie as far as military job training and placement are concerned. If you get high scores on the word knowledge ASVAB test, for instance, you may qualify to go into linguistics or some other language based field. Of course, you might score higher in math or science based fields, which could alter your results drastically. But you won’t know until you take the test.
The Dreaded Word Portion
Now that you understand more about the test, it’s time to get over the fear of the word knowledge ASVAB portion of the test. The questions you’re likely to encounter with this portion of the test might include something like:
1. A souvenir is a great way to remember your vacation once you arrive home.
A. sacrifice
B. Emblem
C. Memento
D. Symbol
In this case, C. Momento would be the right answer. So you see that you only need to brush up on your vocabulary to tackle this portion of the test, but you have eight other categories to worry about. You can’t just focus on one aspect of the test, hurriedly trying to memorize the dictionary for fear that they’ll throw a word at you that you don’t know. Your best bet is to just give the test everything you’ve got, including the word knowledge ASVAB. Your strengths will shine through, whether they’re in mechanical engineering, computers or some other field. You’ve just got to have faith that the test will reveal the career path you were meant to follow once you actually do enlist.

Quality Education

Pub Quizzes – Writing Your General Knowledge Questions

Many pub quizzes fails because of the way in which the questions are written and the topics that are chosen. Some quizzes fail because they focus far too much on one particular topic, others because the questions are not challenging enough. Of course you don’t want to have to have a PhD in the topics to even be close to being able to answer the questions so get a good balance.

Below is a quick guide on what the quiz master should be looking for on quality questions and answers.

Most pub quizzes have a spread out age groups from different walks of life so be sure to accommodate the majority when setting your questions and answers.

Topics and Subjects. Most quizzes have general knowledge, handout and specialist topics rounds in them. General knowledge should be a wide variety of topics that covers general every day things and events. Picking the questions from different eras and topics in an even split is the best way. Look for History, Geography, Music, TV and Films and Science as a good grounding but also try to get some local themed questions as well. Questions of a particular subject should be kept set similar always taking into account where possible a difference of age group and interests. You should try and avoid the same people answering and enable the rest of team member to answer questions.

Difficulty of Questions. This is very important but generally the easiest way is make several questions that are easy, quite difficult and more tasking questions that way you get a nice selections within the quiz. When compiling the actual pub quiz split these up evenly in to general knowledge rounds. If doing a specialist topic then split the mix of question difficulty levels within the round.

Quality question and answers – Making questions enjoyable isn’t that difficult but you need to follow some simple rules.

Pub quiz teams should be able to discuss, argue and throw answers out to each other, they can be challenging but not impossible to guess. Make sure that when compiling questions you look at ways to make them chance of guessing when possible.

The question has to hold their interest if it doesn’t then the team members will more than likely not have a clue about the answer. If the team gets the answer wrong they will want to be able to go away with something new. Something they can quiz their friends with the next day or so.

Keep the questions in the public domain with seldom going into the realms of obscure. The more bizarre the questions the more likely you are to put quiz goers off coming again. Not to say you can’t have a couple spread about the quiz.

Hopefully this quick guide will help you compiling questions and answers for your pub quiz.

Education Policy

Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management

Basically, Knowledge Management (KM) describes how processes participants (particularly decision processes) utilize all resources (particularly information resources) to achieve their goals with precision, accuracy, on time and on budget inside every organization. In order to reach this objective, Knowledge Management comprises Information Systems for capture and shows participants or users best expertise, Human Resources Administration for selecting, take and learn their best talents and expertise in their knowledge areas, documented and undocumented procedures with business rules for standardize organization’s activities and Finance for quantifying their talent and expertise value, performance and importance for the organization.
From this point of view, Knowledge Management is focused in how every key employee of an organization executes her key activities timely, without errors, following business rules (or not), how this business rules are efficient and effective (or not) and how this employee make decisions: which information pieces support this decisions and how this information pieces can configure some behaviors (or not).
Additionally from this perspective, Business Intelligence is a tool, a resource to be used for participants to make decisions. BI describes how organization is making business and how much focused is organization about achieving its goals.
Business Intelligence is about organization’s performance, Knowledge Management is about organization’s behavior in order to obtain the best way to make best business activities (particularly decisions). Here is the key about these two definitions. Other way to understand these definitions, differences and relationships is: BI describes the performance of organization’s activities and KM describes the organization’s components activities that produce the obtained performance. BI captures and tries to improve business results, KM captures and tries to improve organization processes and activities.
Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management together are capable to dramatically improve overall performance of any organization, but it is necessary to understand, plan and apply every implementation carefully. All BI and KM implementations must be fully supported by all organization’s stakeholders and executive levels. With their full commitment, these tools can boost all organization’s personnel productivity and, of course, profitability.

Education For All

Gaining Knowledge – How We Use All of the Resources Available to Us to Scale the Heights

There are three kinds of knowledge available to us: through other’s experience, through our own experience, and through our innate intelligence and experience. When we climb mountains, we need to use all three.
Through other’s experience, we gain knowledge that prepares us for the journey ahead by gaining greater awareness about it; insights and knowledge about the mountain will help us to make correct decisions when we encounter the mountain. Through our own experience, we gain knowledge about what works for us, what enables us on our actual quest and the nature of that quest. Our innate intelligence and experience – instincts – helps us to make decisions when neither the knowledge we have gained from others nor our own experience seems adequate. What if something we encounter on the trail that we did not learn about and have never experienced confuses us? What do we do then?
This is where we learn to trust ourselves, to have faith in ourselves, our innate abilities and intelligence. If we have the time and have brought resources – perhaps other people or information – with us, we can stop and consult these resources. Even though we have these resources, we may not find information and solutions that make us comfortable. Sometimes we need to decide what’s best for us by consulting our innate, inner resources.
What exactly are these inner resources? We know we have resources within us by the fact that our hearts pump, our lungs breath, our blood circulates. These physical resources sustain us, they keep us alive. We know they operate through their own intelligence. That is, we do not consciously direct them; they are either self-directed or there is an intelligence within us – a subconscious one perhaps – that does. If they are self-directed, then contained within their function, their cells, is the intelligence that does. Whether this intelligence is automatic doesn’t matter. Intelligence is not necessarily a reflection of conscious choice. We have all witnessed conscious choices – perhaps our own – that have been anything but intelligent. When birds fly south for the winter, it is what we call an instinct; we understand that the bird is not making a conscious decision – weighing the pros and cons – about flying south. It just is and does, and we don’t think the decision is any less intelligent because of this. In fact, remaining up north for the winter, freezing and dying, would be a pretty stupid thing to do.
Our heart may react to our circumstances and pump faster or slower enabling us to perform an activity to our greatest physical capacity. Like the bird, our heart just is and does, making innate, instinctive decisions. Like the bird, these decisions are not any less intelligent because they are innate. If our heart didn’t pump faster, we would faint, drop from exhaustion, or die. So not pumping faster would be a pretty stupid thing for our heart to do.
Where does this innate intelligence come from, what is its source? Does it reside within us each individually or does it originate elsewhere? Now we’re again talking about the big picture. What we believe about the nature of the universe is not initially important. However, gaining an awareness of this innate intelligence within us that guides and is capable of guiding us is important. As we get in touch with this ability, this intelligence, we can make up our own minds about the big picture, about the nature of the universe. We will be able to do so as we learn to believe in and trust ourselves. We can make that decision independently from our own knowledge and experience.
If we believe a source of intelligence lies within us, then our heart may know to beat faster because of information, knowledge, imbedded either in its own cells, cells somewhere else in the body, or a combination therein. An event occurs and information stored in the cells triggers an intelligent response by the heart. Our heart has an innate, intuitive, instinctual intelligence.
Could our heart be a microcosm of a macrocosm, representative of the whole? We understand that other organs of our body may operate in the same way. But what of our total body, including our brain? Could there be information stored in the cells of our body and brain that could help us to decide whether it’s better to go north or south when we are climbing a mountain, when we are unsure where in the world we find ourselves? Is there an innate intelligence that could aid us in these situations? If so, how do we get in touch with it?
Most of us have heard popular words to describe innate intelligence. We may have been told to trust our instincts or follow our intuition. We may have some experiences which validate a belief in these concepts or we may feel it’s a lot of hocus pocus. Again, we must each decide for ourselves. But we should keep an open mind, allow for the possibilities, or we shut down to opportunities for growth.
Personally, I have come to believe in innate intelligence. It is what I have come to call self-knowledge. It is knowledge of the self, gained by the self. That is, we learn about ourselves, and the knowledge that enables our learning resides within us.
I have found that I can access this knowledge, this guidance, by asking questions of myself. When I am confused, unsure, upset, or sad, I can ask myself a question, pause, and wait for an answer. I have done this verbally, in my mind, and by putting pen to paper. Some may say the answers are my imagination, my conscious mind answering itself. Whatever the source, I have found these answers insightful and sometimes inspiring. When I have trusted them, trusted myself, I have found my viewpoint expanded and my ability to act positively in the world empowered.
To specific situations I may ask, “What is a greater understanding about this, what should my response be, what can I or do I need to learn from this, how can I make this better, how can I help, what do I need to know to enable my decision, why am I feeling this way, how can I feel and perceive the situation differently?” I have also asked more profound questions regarding the big picture and my relationship to it. I have learned to trust these answers and in turn, myself. Acting upon them in the world, I have seen their truths to be self-evident. Each of us needs to give ourselves the opportunity to discover our intelligence, our truths within.
The ways we discover our innate intelligence can be different for each of us. It may be through our passions, interests, avocation, loving actions, or contemplative, supplicative, and meditative states. When we are open to it, when we believe and seek its expression in the world, our innate intelligence can be reached. It may be in the form of insight, of spontaneous right action, inspiration, a feeling in the body, a creative visualization, or a conviction as to the meaning of something. Whatever its expression, we know it when it happens, we just need to allow it into our lives by trusting ourselves.
When we trust ourselves and allow this innate intelligence into our lives, we can help our children develop it in theirs. We do this by making them aware of it. We can discuss it with them, what it is, how it works, and give them examples in our own lives. Again, when we do this we are human, sharing our lives with them and giving them opportunities to learn and grow. By our example and through their own innate intelligence, our children will learn to make the best decisions for themselves.

Education World

Technical Documentation for Effective Knowledge Transfer

What drives us to produce technical documentation, who produces them and what types are commonly in use? When we think of something as being technical we usually think of something in a technological, mechanical or scientific arena that is characterised by an area of specialization. Technical documentation can refer to any document that describes the construction, handling, specifications, maintenance, installation, design, disposal and/or functionality of a product at any stage of development. The documentation is usually supplied by the manufacturer of the product and examples include operating and maintenance manuals, user guides, configuration and installation guides and training manuals.
Technical documentation must be clear, consistent, unambiguous, user-centred, comprehensive and accurate and to produce them technical writers must have expert subject matter knowledge besides good writing and research skills, trade experience and an understanding of the terminology and jargon used in a particular area. Consistency of technical documentation is what inspires that subliminal sense of trustworthiness, reliability and confidence in the users. Inconsistent technical documentation with missing or non-sequential page numbers, chapter headings printed in different fonts and sizes or figure legends that do not match the illustration would certainly not inspire any confidence in the product or item purchased.
Planning for technical papers needs to be considered from the outset so that the document management life-cycle can form part of the product development process and be concluded on time and within budget. When documentation is carefully planned and well written by trained technical communication professionals, they can add significant value. The benefit of well written technical documentation is increased sales, cost saving, decreased product returns and the maintenance of good relationships with customers. Technical documentation can allow the end-user to perform a process more efficiently and also to understand and use a product effectively while conveying a professional and trustworthy image.
Producing effective technical papers is not a simplistic task because the writing is for people and all people have their unique set of preferences and learning styles. Some will prefer more text and fewer illustrations and some would prefer the reverse. Others would like the amount of detail to me limited while some will expect as much detail as possible. Finding a balance is difficult and testing documentation on focus groups of users can sometimes help to find common ground. Queries and feedback should also be considered as well as technical updates to documentation. Whatever the format decided upon, good quality documentation facilitates information dissemination and knowledge transfer.

School

Business Architecture – The Power of Knowledge Standardisation and Re-Use

One thing everyone on our team has noticed is that whilst the concept of business architecture is not new, it is not exactly in common use either.

We have also noticed that where it is practiced, to a demonstrably good effect, tends to be in the larger national or international organisations, who are often the leaders in their frequently means that, as they have deep pockets and ‘special’ needs, that they typically build their business architectures completely from scratch and to employ expensive consultants to help them do it.

There is nothing what-so-ever wrong with this, but not that many organisations in the grand scheme of things can afford the luxury of doing this work from scratch such that it is tailored 100% to their exact needs. This is a shame as we believe most organisations would benefit from the coordination and common understanding that building and having a business architecture makes possible.

Too many organisations feel that this sort of up-front outlay on ‘thinking things through’ is something they cannot all too often the truth of the matter is just the can’t afford not to do it!

The situation as we see it is simple. The largest, best and most profitable organisations can afford to build business architectures and they benefit accordingly. Smaller or less profitable organisations who could arguably benefit even more from the discipline and structure a business architecture can bring cannot or don’t feel that they can afford it and suffer accordingly.

So the problem from our perspective seems to be how to bridge this affordability gap.

We feel the answer, as has been the case in many other business contexts related to timescale and affordability issues, is to pre-package and re-use the knowledge through standardisation.

There are many examples through history of the winning ways of standardisation, including:

Language, spelling and punctuation so we can communicate more readily;

Mechanical fasteners (e.g. nuts & bolts) to be interchangeable across uses;

Railway lines to enable trains to run on one another’s networks;

Controls of automobiles so we can safely drive different models of car;

Electronic chip modules so that they can be easily used in many different designs.

We could list many more examples, but the above are probably sufficient to make the point about the benefits of pre-packaging and re-use through standardisation!

Yes, standardisation and re-use does mean accepting an approach that is not 100% tailored to you from the outset……although you can still work in this direction if you really feel the and more importantly can cost-justify it.

However, it also means you can get off to a running start, can take only what you need, can modify / extend only what you need and then get on with the business of the knowledge that you are starting work within an integrated structure in which all the key actors fit together and know their respective roles.

Also, for the benefit of our more skeptical , in our experience, depending on personal initiative and serendipity for this degree of coordination and control is not an equally good alternative!

Therefore we strongly support the use of a generic, cross-industry ‘starter’ business architecture. An architecture that to be sure all or most users will find a need to modify to their needs – i.e. delete parts, add parts, extend parts, modify parts, ignore parts, etc – until it is what you need it to be.

But the difference with this approach is that you now will have to hand a solid foundation on which to construct your own business architecture and not just some blank sheets of paper (or screen) with some modeling rules.

The latter being infinitely where to start, where to stop and how do you know if you are doing it right?

Further, we contend, as we do in most things, that the 80/20 Rule (i.e. Pareto Principle) strongly applies to business transformation initiatives.

When you really think about it why should most organisations, other than out of a form of conceit that they are so ‘special’, need or even want to re-invent the wheel of widely accepted business good practice?

We would argue that roughly 80% (give or take) of what most organisations do can be adequately accomplished in fairly standardised ways……think running a payroll system for instance. So re-creating those things falls into the camp of adding only 20% (or less) of the potential business typically just makes it harder to do things like outsource non-core activities or buy standard software!

Then there is the 20% (again, give or take) of what organisations do that are, and should be, unique to them……think ways particular to you through which you achieve high customer satisfaction rates. You DO NOT want to standardise is what sets you apart and differentiates you from your competition. This is where the 80% (or more) of the potential business value lives.

To us, common sense dictates (or, more accurately, shouts) that you should spend as little time, money or effort on bedding in the standard 80% of things you do every day as you reasonably can. This is so that you can spend as much time, money and effort as possible on the really important 20% that makes your organisation unique and special to your customers and other key stakeholders!

This is, by the way, quite a powerful argument for NOT undertaking to do 100% tailored business architectures as brought to you by very expensive consultants. It does in fact (surprise, surprise) support our view that starting from something that is already pretty in some cases good enough, and modifying it as your situation and opportunities dictate is a very pragmatic, cost-effective and attractive way to proceed.

We truly and sincerely believe that the only thing most organisations really need to give up to benefit from our approach is any conceit they may have that everything they do is ‘special’ and cannot be standardised or based on the re-use of knowledge to any significant extent.

We have news for those who think this by the way.

In our extensive experience of advising on business transformations and business architectures to organisations around the just ain’t so. Not even in the largest and most specialised of global players!