Quality Education

Pub Quizzes – Writing Your General Knowledge Questions

Many pub quizzes fails because of the way in which the questions are written and the topics that are chosen. Some quizzes fail because they focus far too much on one particular topic, others because the questions are not challenging enough. Of course you don’t want to have to have a PhD in the topics to even be close to being able to answer the questions so get a good balance.

Below is a quick guide on what the quiz master should be looking for on quality questions and answers.

Most pub quizzes have a spread out age groups from different walks of life so be sure to accommodate the majority when setting your questions and answers.

Topics and Subjects. Most quizzes have general knowledge, handout and specialist topics rounds in them. General knowledge should be a wide variety of topics that covers general every day things and events. Picking the questions from different eras and topics in an even split is the best way. Look for History, Geography, Music, TV and Films and Science as a good grounding but also try to get some local themed questions as well. Questions of a particular subject should be kept set similar always taking into account where possible a difference of age group and interests. You should try and avoid the same people answering and enable the rest of team member to answer questions.

Difficulty of Questions. This is very important but generally the easiest way is make several questions that are easy, quite difficult and more tasking questions that way you get a nice selections within the quiz. When compiling the actual pub quiz split these up evenly in to general knowledge rounds. If doing a specialist topic then split the mix of question difficulty levels within the round.

Quality question and answers – Making questions enjoyable isn’t that difficult but you need to follow some simple rules.

Pub quiz teams should be able to discuss, argue and throw answers out to each other, they can be challenging but not impossible to guess. Make sure that when compiling questions you look at ways to make them chance of guessing when possible.

The question has to hold their interest if it doesn’t then the team members will more than likely not have a clue about the answer. If the team gets the answer wrong they will want to be able to go away with something new. Something they can quiz their friends with the next day or so.

Keep the questions in the public domain with seldom going into the realms of obscure. The more bizarre the questions the more likely you are to put quiz goers off coming again. Not to say you can’t have a couple spread about the quiz.

Hopefully this quick guide will help you compiling questions and answers for your pub quiz.

Quality Education

My Own Logo Design Process

The start is always the hardest part. When I started seven years ago, I found logo design tiring, complicated, and never thought that rejection is a normal thing here in this profession. Although through the years, I had slowly learned that these tedious processes will shape me to the designer I am supposed to become.
Design process is relative. It depends on the designer’s background or preferences. Designers from art schools are generally process oriented, or they tend to follow the basic steps, designing the textbook way. Ouido designers like me usually have a different approach to the design process, and our approach vary according to our background, to how we started as designers.
In my case, I really do not have one standard way of approaching a design process. It depends on the client and the project. Yet my usual design process is divided into three parts: understanding the clients’ needs and niches, sketching, and conceptualization.
Learn and understand the client, the client’s niche.
Typically, it is hard to please clients without knowing what pleases them. As a commercial designer, you should always start the design process with your clients and it should end with them as well.
Understanding your client’s industry is the best way to begin a logo design process. It is a requirement you have to experience as a designer. Knowing the client’s business from root to top, from rudiments to its broader industry functions, help build the foundation of the design process. Normally, you have to focus on their goals (mission and vision), their social stand (advocacies, company beliefs, affiliate organizations) and their history as a business, because logos are virtual representations of these things.
Put your interest to their niche. Understand it deeply and relate it to their goals as a business. Learning all these things will avoid future logo demise and criticisms.
You should then get your clients’ ideas, their wants, suggestions, and needs. It is their prerogative if they wish to be part of the design process; yet as a designer, it’s your responsibility to align their wants (taste, likings, requirements) to the principles of logo design (simplicity, relevance).
Start sketching
Now, it is time to use all the information you have gathered from the initial step. Start putting your own interpretation on a blank paper through sketching. Do not limit yourself in drawing ideas from your mind. Do not use rulers and measuring tools just yet. Just do the freehand drawing, as if you are only playing. Just draw until you get tired of it.
Conceptualization, main design
The main part of conceptualization comes after sketching. Here, you will organize your sketches and come up with solid logo ideas with measurement, contrast, and typeface in mind. This process is not like, and very different from, sketching. In design, conceptualization is the process of putting your initial ideas to actual logo designs or final products. This is the part where you adhere to your client’s needs, and where you combine this adherence with your design knowledge and inclination without crossing the borders of their corporate beliefs and goals. This is therefore, the real job, where you combine your talent with your client’s needs to come up with one final design.
Normally, clients require designers to submit at least three to ten design concepts to choose from. Some companies have these designs for internal company voting, polls, and surveys to have an idea of its efficiency and recall for the people. From here, they will suggest criticisms, revisions, and even make rejections.